How to Start a High-Impact Mentoring Program

Looking to start a mentoring program? That’s great. Mentoring is a proven approach to drive rich learning and development for both mentees and mentors. Mentoring also benefits the sponsoring organization.

For employers, mentoring increases retention, promotion rates, and employee satisfaction. At universities, student mentoring is proven to improve student retention, boost job placement rates, and increase alumni engagement when tapping alumni as mentors.

A thriving, impactful mentoring program is within your reach. But great mentoring programs don’t just happen. They are built through thoughtful planning and sustained commitment to guiding participants through the mentoring process while continually improving the program.

Sound like a lot of work? It can be, but the right tools will make the effort much easier. Mentoring software provides a complete program environment that helps organizations start, manage, and measure all types of mentoring programs.

There are 5 key steps to take when designing and implementing your program:

1. Design your mentoring program.

Successful mentoring programs offer both structure and flexibility. Structure provides participants a mentoring workflow to follow and is critical to help participants achieve productive learning that reaches defined goals. Similarly, flexibility is essential to support varying individual mentoring needs across specific learning goals, preferences, and learning style.

Key design decisions include:

Enrollment – is it open, application, or invite only?
Mentoring style – can be traditional, flash, reverse
Connection type – possibly 1:1, group, or project
Connection duration – typically weeks or months, or perhaps even just a single session
Community/social aspects beyond formal mentoring, tracking and reporting needs.
2. Attract participants

The best designed mentoring programs won’t get far without effective program promotion, mentor recruitment, and training.

You will need to convince them that participating is worth their time and effort. Beyond participants, key leaders and stakeholders will need to be educated on the benefits of the program and strategic value to the organization. Here’s a quick checklist:

Promote the benefits to participants and stakeholders
Consider recognition and rewards for participants
Provide training and reinforecement throughout the program
3. Connect mentors and mentees

A productive mentoring relationship depends on a good match. Matching starts by deciding which type of matching you’ll offer in your program: self-matching or admin-matching. Consider giving mentees a say in the matching process by allowing them to select a particular mentor or submit their top three choices. Self-matching is administrative light, which in larger programs can be a huge plus.

For more structured programs, such as large groups of new students at universities, or groups of new corporate employees, you may want to get the program started by bulk, or admin-matching.

Matching best practices start with a solid profile for all participants (mentors and mentees). Critical profile elements include development goals, specific topical interests, location, experiences, and matching preferences.

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